In The Weeds

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This Glossy Ibis is a lifer for me. If you’ve ever wondered why it has that long de-curved bill-well the photo below illustrates here’s one reason–a reason why I almost didn’t see the bird. The bill looks just like the curved grasses!:

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Marine Park Salt Marsh

Brooklyn, New York

Hee’s Over Here

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This Eastern Towhee was a lifer for me. Though about the size of a large sparrow, it’s not easy to see in the brush–however you can’t miss its call of Tow-HEE; hee-hee-hee-hee-hee-hee-hee.

Prospect Park,

Brooklyn, New York

The Swan Whisperer

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The young girl was extraordinarily patient with the swan, gently cooing and making slight flapping movements of her arms as if she, too, were a bird. She continued to make little gestures to welcome the swan who, in a trusting manner, gradually approached more and more closely. The girl and the swan were in direct communication with each other. All of the other strangers watching this close encounter, including myself, were mesmerized. When eventually the young girl walked off with her mother, her mother turned to her and said with amazement, “I didn’t know you could talk Swan.”

Marine Park Salt Marsh

Brooklyn, New York

Truly Tule

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Tule Elk

Point Reyes National Seashore, California

Wikipedia says the Tule (Too-Lee) elk is only found in California, and there used to be a half a million of them, but by 1870 they were thought to have been exterminated. A single breeding pair was found in 1875 at the marshes of Buena Vista Lake and steps were taken to breed them; now the number of Tule Elk stands at more than 4000. This guy was part of a herd that roamed through Point Reyes National Seashore Park.